How IndyCar Is Like Bernie: A Study In Socialism

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IndyCar and The Bern share several similarities, surprisingly. They’re extremely popular amongst a certain smallish segment of the population, about a century old and hoping to upset a younger favorite who enjoys better press.

It’s astonishing just how many things IndyCar and Senator Sanders share in common. So much so that perhaps the series should consider renaming them “Bern outs.” You’re probably asking yourself, how can a Socialist from Vermont be anything like a “greedy corporation,” as he’s fond of disparaging? Primarily, both have a demonstrated admiration for socialism. Translated as a central authority (e.g. the federal government or the Board of Directors) exercising vast control over people’s money and freedoms, racing rulers and politicians already do this in spades. Regardless whether it’s government or racing, we the fans pay for it all. “Fairness,” huh?

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Photo from washingtontimes.com

IndyCar’s “Leaders Circle” approach to prize money is, at its base, pure redistributionist socialism. Referred to as “profit sharing,” similar models exist in major league baseball and football as well. Sports’ version of the Marxist principle that we must redistribute wealth, it’s another example of how Bernie’s way has crept into all aspects of modern life, often going unnoticed. Under these strict rules, successful teams are forced to subsidize unsuccessful teams – or the “less fortunate” – to the tune of millions of dollars every year. As every IndyCar fan knows, encouraging more teams like Dale Coyne’s is precisely NOT what’s needed.

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Photos from dailymail.co.uk

Problem is, there’s no real choice. Owners, sponsors and teams are required (i.e. forced) to share the wealth, or else. In common practice and to most Americans, freedom is all about choices. Under socialism, there just aren’t any. Continue reading

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Mark Miles’ Miserable Metaphor

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Upon reading the piece in the Star, we simply couldn’t believe it. Had he really said  . . . THAT?!

Lost in the lead up to Christmas was a Mark Miles interview with the Indy Star’s Curt Cavin. The story both leads and wraps with Miles using the time worn and ill-considered metaphor “time flies” when asked about his three year anniversary as CEO of Hulman and Company, IMS and IndyCar.

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Photo from 1070thefan.com

Miles’ miserable metaphor typifies both his rule of IndyCar and his inability to communicate effectively. Of all times to reference flight, this year wasn’t the one. Of course cars aren’t supposed to fly, though the season was marred by flying aero kit pieces, flying cars at Indy and another flying piece of debris that sadly took Justin Wilson’s life. Miles started the interview off saying time flies – talk about inappropriate!

Mark Miles Flying Circus

Cavin’s article cited all those calamities and others, including the humiliating race cancellation in Brazil. Sound issues and traffic problems at IMS for the Rolling Stones concert last year were even aired, as Miles’ incompetence was on full parade. Good grief, they’ve only been holding Stones concerts successfully all over the world for half a century now.

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Photo from magazine.foxnews.com

On a more timely note, the CEO admitted that the aero kits introduced in 2015 were “not entirely positive.” Continue reading