100th Indy 500 Predictions and Prognostications: History Yet To Be Made

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Auto racing’s most important race ever is mere days away, the 100th running of the Indy 500. A fixture at Indianapolis, one thing’s always certain: history will be made come Memorial Day Sunday.

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Our special 100th Indianapolis 500 prediction is a whole lot of yellow – the angular 100th 500 emblem, countless canary cars, hordes of yellow shirts and yes, also a goodly number of caution flags. In IndyCar, that means lots of twenty minute snack and bathroom breaks for the spectators. With six full fledged rookies, another who barely started the 500, several more Month of May one offs and Takuma Sato in the field there’s bound to be some crashing. As for nearly half the field being yellow liveried, despite the odds we’re predicting a non-yellow car to win.

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There’ll be no track record again this year, far from it. The pole speed won’t hit  Continue reading

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IndyCar News Week In Review: Money, Money Edition

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Money, money makes the racing world go ’round. As usual, for many teams there isn’t nearly enough of it.

Andretti Swallows Herta, Spits Chaves Out: In yet another case of contraction for IndyCar teams following the CFH Racing divorce, Andretti Autosport’s absorbed Bryan Herta Autosport, subtracting another team from the grid – not to mention an Autosport. Herta’s tiny, underfunded one car effort will now comprise AA’s fourth car, with former F1 driver American Alexander Rossi as the driver. Rookie of the Year Gabby “Pat” Chaves was unceremoniously dumped despite Herta’s earlier intimations that he’d be back. Obviously the price wasn’t right.

 

Money, Money: Funding was reportedly the issue at BHA, as was the case with CFHR reverting back to Ed Carpenter Racing this year. For a switch, instead of Michael it’s Herta who makes us ask, “what’s Bryan thinking” in casting his lot with the troubled Andrettis? Perhaps he’s planning a driving comeback and wants to takeover Marco’s seat, given the money and the fact that Marco’s not been using it effectively.

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Phillips Out, Pappas In: In a further shakeup at 16th & Georgetown, longtime engineer Bill Pappas is taking over as VP of Competition, Race Engineering for IndyCar. Continue reading

IndyCar News Week in Review: Sleazy Season Edition

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Update: The gorgeous, talented and racy Courtney Force is still planning to marry IndyCar pilot Graham Rahal on November 21st, dammit.

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Jay Frye Sizzles: New IndyCar competition president Jay Frye is settling into his new office at Indianapolis Motor Speedway. While IRR couldn’t confirm the fact that Frye has been complaining loudly of “old man stink” after his predecessor Derrick Walker moved out, we couldn’t disconfirm it, either.

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Munoz Isn’t Moving: Cunning Colombian Carlos Munoz Continue reading

Proposed IndyCar Canopies Not Half as Bad as First Thought, Years Down the Road

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According to a recent article in USA Today where Jeff Olson interviewed crusty old IndyCar Chief of Competition Derrick Walker, concerns expressed here and elsewhere about the proposed idea of canopies for IndyCars were allayed. He mentioned having only a “front half of a canopy,” stating an entire enclosure would be unnecessary and even detrimental to the quick escape from cars by drivers.

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The Ford Lotus Indy 500 entrant from 1963 pictured above illustrates how partial enclosures have been around for decades and don’t radically alter the nature of open cockpit cars as full coverings would. Walker also said a chassis redesign would be necessary to install canopies, which isn’t scheduled until 2018. Finally there’s some good news out of IndyCar as traditions aren’t trashed and common sense prevails for a change.